Connect with us

Guides

6 Must-Read Tips For Better NFTs and NFT Trading and Investing in 2022

Published

on

NFTs experienced a significant boom in 2021. In this article, we will cover the details you need to pay attention to when investing in NFTs in 2022.

Anonymous  team

The original NFT Bill of Rights warned about anonymous artists and extended it to the Anon or “unoxxed” teams. Some or part of the team may be exposed for a myriad of reasons, but at least 50% of the team should be fully exposed and discoverable on social media and elsewhere.

  • Moreover, just because a person has a picture on the site does not mean that the person exists.
  • These could be stock photos or AI / ML generated images such as: This person does not exist.
  • You can click Update to see an example. Learn more about our position on anonymity.

Fake accounts and fake followers

Today, buying an old established Twitter account, or even buying a follower, has never been easier. Not only check the Twitter account of the project you are investigating, but also check the Twitter account of “Team” behind the team.

Currently, there are some warning signs.

Account is too old (older than NFT), and it is probably a renovated account of NFT. If you have a large one for the Twitter account, run through Twitter audit and check the tampering of the trailer.

In addition, mismatch bots are incredibly difficult.

Bots we saw an example where users can set up 20 frauds in a few minutes in WLS. This is a service that is easy to create an unnecessary account for people who are easy to create an unwanted account. (such as loop WGMI, GM).

Expensive (or free) coin awards

More and more projects start with NFT premium price tags. Current hype discourages price discovery and allows authors to charge more original coin prices than before.

This is fine for a particular project, but always be careful.

If you feel it isn’t right, the project isn’t worth pursuing. In particular, a checkmark in any of the other boxes indicates that it is a dangerous project.

In addition, free mint has fewer and fewer successful tactics for projects.

Some scammers have found that they can publish their semi-polished websites for free with a little effort. Once the project gains momentum and excitement, the project can generate 100500 ETH volumes, and if the project requires 10,000 ETH, it will be between 25,000 and 150,000 with little effort. (Develop smart contracts for hundreds of dollars with five.)

Limited art

Look for a wide range of artwork, properties, etc. unless the artist is specifically established (and you have a portfolio that you can check). Variety and rarity. It is important to maintain a consistent art profile and portfolio. Even if you don’t love art, or it doesn’t resonate with you, it’s worth passing.

Copy websites

The ongoing theme of high-risk projects is website design and integration. 

The copy-and-paste project began to sprout like weeds after an early version of the banana repository was found on GitHub that provided a complete NFT (Soup to Nuts) project deployment that anyone could download and edit. Today, the coordinated group offers literally many projects in one day, all with slightly different graphics or website customizations. By monitoring the projects you own, you can easily see which projects are similar to each other and avoid pitfalls. Check out the daily drops on the Drop Calendar.

Lack of innovation

The final concern about the project is about the roadmap. Are the projects on the roadmap oversized / promising? Both can be a big danger signal for the project.

The two big red flags here are 1. Does your project basically have a roadmap available? After booting, there are probably no additional utilities.

In addition, you need to be careful if your project is too promising (AAA games, Play to Earn, advanced tokenomics / staking features).

In addition, you need to have a basic understanding of securities laws and regulations in your country (because this can be a carpet in the long run).

Toxicity

Although not widely known, it is a violation of OpenSeaToS for a project builder to clean up the floor. If you do this, your project may lose things like the blue checkmark.

Also, if a project (including moderators) overwhelms valid criticism of the project, it indicates that something else may be happening behind the scenes.

Derivatives

99/100 times the derivative is sign of red flag. There are outliers, but they are not common. Blockchain makes it very easy to copy metadata, graphics, etc. and make basic changes. There are examples of derivatives that take in ideas and fuse them with something else to become truly unique (and a new creation in their own right). However, if you’re not sure, it’s worth skipping the project altogether.

Conclusion

Most projects (even if they aren’t intended for carpet) are designed to get you out of ETH. Approach a skeptical project.
surveys, team surveys, roadmaps and more. If you miss the project, there will be another 3550 tomorrow.

Do your own research and find the strategy that suits you. More importantly, scammers have the knack for investigating the latest trends and techniques in combination with the ability to exploit human nature to prey on prey (moderate agnostics).

Some final tips to keep you safer:

  • Find Your Tribe: Find a Discord Community with a solid track record of project reviews and open communication / dialogs about the pros and cons of the project.
  • DYOR: Cross-link to artists, websites, embossed sites, etc. A five-minute study can save thousands of dollars in ETH that can be lost if you accidentally emboss a rug project.
  • If in doubt, pass the project
  • Do not sign anything opened from email. (Actually, you need to send the email in a different browser than your wallet).

Advertisement logo
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Guides

Interesting Knowledges About Satoshi Nakamoto’s Identity

Published

on

By

silhouette of man
  • Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? Satoshi Nakamoto is the pseudonym used by the unknown person or group of people who created Bitcoin, the world’s first and most widely used decentralized digital currency. Nakamoto’s true identity has never been revealed, and the individual or group behind the pseudonym has remained anonymous.
  • Hal Finney, Nick Szabo, and Adam Back as potential candidates for the identity of Satoshi Nakamoto Hal Finney, Nick Szabo, and Adam Back have all been suggested as potential candidates for the identity of Satoshi Nakamoto, the pseudonym used by the creator of Bitcoin. However, none of these claims have been independently verified and the true identity of Nakamoto remains unknown.
  • How to determine the identity of Satoshi Nakamoto If one were trying to determine the identity of Satoshi Nakamoto, they might consider using a variety of investigative techniques and tools, such as analyzing the writing style and language used in written materials attributed to Nakamoto, examining the technical expertise required to create Bitcoin, analyzing the timing of the release of the Bitcoin white paper and the first block, and examining the online activity of potential candidates.
  • Is there any secret message on the nickname “Satoshi Nakamoto”? There is no evidence to suggest that the pseudonym “Satoshi Nakamoto” has any hidden or secret meaning. The name was chosen by the individual or group behind the pseudonym as a way to remain anonymous while publishing the Bitcoin white paper and creating the Bitcoin network.
  • Relationships between Satoshi Okamoto, the cypherpunk movement, Hal Finney, Dorian Nakamoto, and Bitcoin Satoshi Okamoto is a Japanese philosopher and economist who is not known to have any direct connection to the development of Bitcoin or the cypherpunk movement. Hal Finney was a computer scientist and cryptographer who was an early adopter of Bitcoin and is known to have had a close relationship with the individual or group behind the pseudonym “Satoshi Nakamoto.” Dorian Nakamoto is a person who was incorrectly identified in a 2014 article as being the creator of Bitcoin. Dorian Nakamoto has no known connection to the development of the cryptocurrency or the cypherpunk movement.
  • Is Dorian Nakamoto’s real name Satoshi Nakamoto? Yes, Dorian Nakamoto is the real name of the person who was incorrectly identified in a 2014 article as being the creator of Bitcoin. Dorian Nakamoto’s name is often written as “Dorian Prentice Satoshi Nakamoto.” Despite being incorrectly identified as the creator of Bitcoin, Dorian Nakamoto has no known connection to the development of the cryptocurrency.

Continue Reading

Guides

How to create token on Avalanche?

Published

on

By

To create a token on Avalanche, you will need to have an Avalanche wallet and some AVAX, the native token of the Avalanche network. AVAX is used to pay for transaction fees and other services on the Avalanche network.

Here is a brief overview of the steps involved in creating a token on Avalanche:

  1. First, you will need to choose a name and a symbol for your token. The name and symbol should be unique and should not be already in use by another token on the Avalanche network.
  2. Next, you will need to decide on the total supply of your token. This is the total number of tokens that will be created and minted on the Avalanche network.
  3. Once you have chosen a name, symbol, and total supply for your token, you can use the Avalanche blockchain to create your token. This involves submitting a “minting transaction” to the Avalanche network, which will create your token and add it to the Avalanche blockchain.
  4. After your token has been created, you can use it for a variety of purposes, such as creating a decentralized application (dApp) or running a crowdfunding campaign. You can also trade your token on decentralized exchanges that support trading on the Avalanche network.

If you want to create a token on Avalanche using a smart contract, you will need to write the code for your smart contract. Avalanche supports the use of smart contracts written in a variety of languages, including Solidity and JavaScript. Here is an example of a simple smart contract written in Solidity that could be used to create a token on Avalanche:

pragma solidity ^0.7.0;

// This is a simple ERC-20 compatible token contract
contract MyToken {
  // The name of the token
  string public name;

  // The symbol of the token
  string public symbol;

  // The total supply of the token
  uint256 public totalSupply;

  // The balance of each address that holds the token
  mapping(address => uint256) public balanceOf;

  // The constructor of the contract, which sets the name, symbol, and total supply
  constructor(string memory _name, string memory _symbol, uint256 _totalSupply) public {
    name = _name;
    symbol = _symbol;
    totalSupply = _totalSupply;
    balanceOf[msg.sender] = totalSupply;
  }

  // A function that allows the owner of the contract to mint new tokens
  function mint(uint256 _amount) public {
    require(msg.sender == owner);
    totalSupply += _amount;
    balanceOf[msg.sender] += _amount;
  }

  // A function that allows users to transfer tokens to other addresses
  function transfer(address _to, uint256 _amount) public {
    require(balanceOf[msg.sender] >= _amount);
    balanceOf[msg.sender] -= _amount;
    balanceOf[_to] += _amount;
  }
}
  }

  // A function that allows users to transfer tokens to other addresses
  function transfer(address _to, uint256 _amount) public {
    require(balanceOf[msg.sender] >= _amount);
    balanceOf[msg.sender] -= _amount;
    balanceOf[_to] += _amount;
  }
}

This smart contract defines a simple ERC-20 compatible token that has a name, symbol, and total supply. It also includes functions for minting new tokens and transferring tokens to other addresses.

Continue Reading

Guides

How to create your own token on Solana?

Published

on

By

To create a token on the Solana blockchain, you will need to have a Solana wallet and some SOL, the native token of the Solana network. SOL is used to pay for transaction fees and other services on the Solana network.

Here is a brief overview of the steps involved in creating a token on Solana:

  1. First, you will need to choose a name and a symbol for your token. The name and symbol should be unique and should not be already in use by another token on the Solana network.
  2. Next, you will need to decide on the total supply of your token. This is the total number of tokens that will be created and minted on the Solana network.
  3. Once you have chosen a name, symbol, and total supply for your token, you can use the Solana blockchain to create your token. This involves submitting a “minting transaction” to the Solana network, which will create your token and add it to the Solana blockchain.
  4. After your token has been created, you can use it for a variety of purposes, such as creating a decentralized application (dApp) or running a crowdfunding campaign. You can also trade your token on decentralized exchanges that support trading on the Solana network.

If you want to create a token on Solana using a smart contract, you will need to write the code for your smart contract. Solana supports the use of smart contracts written in the Rust programming language. Here is an example of a simple smart contract written in Rust that could be used to create a token on Solana:

use solana_sdk::{
    account::Account,
    instruction::{Instruction, InstructionError},
    pubkey::Pubkey,
};

#[derive(Debug, PartialEq)]
enum Error {
    WrongInstruction,
    WrongArgumentLength,
    NotEnoughFunds,
}

impl From<Error> for InstructionError {
    fn from(e: Error) -> Self {
        match e {
            Error::WrongInstruction => InstructionError::InvalidInstructionData,
            Error::WrongArgumentLength => InstructionError::InvalidArgument,
            Error::NotEnoughFunds => InstructionError::AccountBalanceInsufficient,
        }
    }
}

#[derive(Debug, PartialEq)]
struct Mint {
    pub mint_account: Pubkey,
    pub recipient_account: Pubkey,
    pub amount: u64,
}

impl Instruction for Mint {
    fn account_keys(&self) -> Vec<Pubkey> {
        vec![self.mint_account, self.recipient_account]
    }

    fn execute(
        &self,
        accounts: &[Account],
        _data: &[u8],
    ) -> Result<(), InstructionError> {
        let mint_account = &accounts[0];
        let recipient_account = &accounts[1];

        if mint_account.executable {
            return Err(Error::WrongInstruction.into());
        }

        if mint_account.lamports < self.amount {
            return Err(Error::NotEnoughFunds.into());
        }

        let mut new_mint_account = *mint_account;
        new_mint_account.lamports -= self.amount;

        let mut new_recipient_account = *recipient_account;
        new_recipient_account.lamports += self.amount;

        Ok(())
    }
}

This smart contract defines a “mint” instruction that can be used to create new tokens and transfer them to a specified recipient account on the Solana blockchain. It includes checks to ensure that the minting account has enough funds to mint the specified number of tokens, and that the instruction is not being executed from an executable account.

Continue Reading
Advertisement e here
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Disclaimer: ATHCrypto's content is meant to be informational in nature and should not be interpreted as investment advice. Trading, buying or selling cryptocurrencies should be considered a high-risk investment and every reader is advised to do their own research before making any decisions.